About a month ago, I wrote an article intended to help you fill some of the gaps left by the missing SQL Server Compact database. Since your Windows Phone 7 Silverlight app is consuming an ObservableCollection of objects streaming down from Windows Azure and SQL Azure, it makes sense to organize those objects in a database-like format that’s easy to work with.  If you’ve ever worked with Remote Data Access (RDA) in the past, the notion of pre-fetching multiple tables to work with locally should look familiar. In this case, each ObservableCollection represents a table, each object represents a row, and each object property represents a column.  I had you create

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About a month ago, I wrote an article intended to help you fill some of the gaps left by the missing SQL Server Compact database. Since your Windows Phone 7 Silverlight app is consuming an ObservableCollection of objects streaming down from Windows Azure and SQL Azure, it makes sense to organize those objects in a database-like format that’s easy to work with.  If you’ve ever worked with Remote Data Access (RDA) in the past, the notion of pre-fetching multiple tables to work with locally should look familiar. In this case, each ObservableCollection represents a table, each object represents a row, and each object property represents a column.  I had you create

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Posted in Windows Phone 7

In my last article of this series, you finally got to consume wireless-friendly WCF REST + JSON Services from both Windows Server and Windows Azure with data coming from SQL Server/SQL Azure. You now have an ObservableCollection of Customer objects residing in a Singleton on your Windows Phone 7 device.  This Singleton looks similar to an in-memory database and the Customers property works like a table. So now what? If you’re like me, you probably want to display the list of Customers in the UI.  You might also want to perform other local operations against this data store.  You could add a new Customer and update or even delete an existing

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In my last article of this series, you finally got to consume wireless-friendly WCF REST + JSON Services from both Windows Server and Windows Azure with data coming from SQL Server/SQL Azure. You now have an ObservableCollection of Customer objects residing in a Singleton on your Windows Phone 7 device.  This Singleton looks similar to an in-memory database and the Customers property works like a table. So now what? If you’re like me, you probably want to display the list of Customers in the UI.  You might also want to perform other local operations against this data store.  You could add a new Customer and update or even delete an existing

Read more

Posted in Windows Phone 7

In my last two articles, I showed you how to build WCF REST services using Visual Studio 2010 that can reside on-premise in Windows Server 2008 or in the Cloud in Windows Azure.  Furthermore, I demonstrated pulling data from a table in SQL Server/SQL Azure.  I serialized .NET Objects using lightweight JSON to speed data transfers over even the slowest wireless data networks.  Now it’s time to call that REST service from Windows Phone 7. Launch VS2010 and open the solution you created to build the WCF Service Web Role in Azure last time.  Right-click on the solution and add a Windows Phone Application project.  Change the name to ContosoPhone. Part

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In my last two articles, I showed you how to build WCF REST services using Visual Studio 2010 that can reside on-premise in Windows Server 2008 or in the Cloud in Windows Azure.  Furthermore, I demonstrated pulling data from a table in SQL Server/SQL Azure.  I serialized .NET Objects using lightweight JSON to speed data transfers over even the slowest wireless data networks.  Now it’s time to call that REST service from Windows Phone 7. Launch VS2010 and open the solution you created to build the WCF Service Web Role in Azure last time.  Right-click on the solution and add a Windows Phone Application project.  Change the name to ContosoPhone. Part

Read more

Posted in Windows Phone 7

Let’s start at the server and work our way to the phone.  Anyone who knows me is probably aware that I come from a wireless background so I’m always obsessed with things like coverage, bandwidth and latency when it comes to building mobile systems.  The only thing I assume in mobile development is frequent network dropouts and 28.8 kb/s modem speeds.  Think Compuserve.  For device apps to be successful, they must pre-fetch the data they need and cache it offline so a user can keep working when the network is not around.  This is not typical SOA, calling Web Services on-demand to help drive your application.  If your connectivity is that

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Let’s start at the server and work our way to the phone.  Anyone who knows me is probably aware that I come from a wireless background so I’m always obsessed with things like coverage, bandwidth and latency when it comes to building mobile systems.  The only thing I assume in mobile development is frequent network dropouts and 28.8 kb/s modem speeds.  Think Compuserve.  For device apps to be successful, they must pre-fetch the data they need and cache it offline so a user can keep working when the network is not around.  This is not typical SOA, calling Web Services on-demand to help drive your application.  If your connectivity is that

Read more

Posted in Windows Phone 7