The last time I talked to you about Windows Phone security, I showed you how to encrypt your data and save it in Isolated Storage using Silverlight’s AesManaged class to create a Key and an Initialization Vector (IV) based on a password and salt value.  This gave your consumer and line-of-business apps the iron-clad AES 256 encryption they needed to secure sensitive data.  While this made 3rd-party Windows Phone apps the most secure in the industry, users had to deal with the hassle of entering their credentials each time they launched their secure app.  The reason users had to reenter their credentials each time is because there was no secure way

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The last time I talked to you about Windows Phone security, I showed you how to encrypt your data and save it in Isolated Storage using Silverlight’s AesManaged class to create a Key and an Initialization Vector (IV) based on a password and salt value.  This gave your consumer and line-of-business apps the iron-clad AES 256 encryption they needed to secure sensitive data.  While this made 3rd-party Windows Phone apps the most secure in the industry, users had to deal with the hassle of entering their credentials each time they launched their secure app.  The reason users had to reenter their credentials each time is because there was no secure way

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Posted in Windows phone

Microsoft has brought the power to synchronize data with either SQL Server on-premise or SQL Azure in the cloud to the world of mobility. The profound effects of the Consumerization of IT (CoIT) is blurring the lines between consumers and the enterprise.  The fact that virtually every type of mobile device is now a candidate to make employees productive means that cross-platform, enabling technologies are a must. If you’ve ever synched the music on your iPhone with iTunes, the calendar on your Android device with Gmail, or the Outlook email on your Windows Phone with Exchange, then you understand the importance of sync.  In my experience architecting and building enterprise mobile apps

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Microsoft has brought the power to synchronize data with either SQL Server on-premise or SQL Azure in the cloud to the world of mobility. The profound effects of the Consumerization of IT (CoIT) is blurring the lines between consumers and the enterprise.  The fact that virtually every type of mobile device is now a candidate to make employees productive means that cross-platform, enabling technologies are a must. If you’ve ever synched the music on your iPhone with iTunes, the calendar on your Android device with Gmail, or the Outlook email on your Windows Phone with Exchange, then you understand the importance of sync.  In my experience architecting and building enterprise mobile apps

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Posted in Sync Framework

In this week’s scenario, I’ll illustrate how Windows Phone utilizes many of Gartner’s Mobile Enterprise Application Platform Critical Capabilities to connect to Microsoft’s Cloud services in Azure

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In this week’s scenario, I’ll illustrate how Windows Phone utilizes many of Gartner’s Mobile Enterprise Application Platform Critical Capabilities to connect to Microsoft’s Cloud services in Azure

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Posted in MEAP

In this week’s scenario, I’ll illustrate how Windows Phone utilizes many of Gartner’s Critical Capabilities to connect to Microsoft’s On-Premise infrastructure.

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In this week’s scenario, I’ll illustrate how Windows Phone utilizes many of Gartner’s Critical Capabilities to connect to Microsoft’s On-Premise infrastructure.

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Posted in MEAP

Looking back over the last 6 months of this series of articles, you’ve created wireless-efficient WCF REST + JSON Web Services in Azure to download data from SQL Azure tables to Windows Phone. You’ve maintained in-memory collections of objects in your own local NoSQL object cache.  You’ve used LINQ to query those collections and bind results to various Silverlight UI elements.  You’ve even serialized those collections to Isolated Storage using memory-efficient JSON.  So what’s left to do? Oh yeah, I guess you might want to know how to upload an object full to data back to a WCF Web Service in Azure.  In order to keep this article simple and to-the-point,

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Looking back over the last 6 months of this series of articles, you’ve created wireless-efficient WCF REST + JSON Web Services in Azure to download data from SQL Azure tables to Windows Phone. You’ve maintained in-memory collections of objects in your own local NoSQL object cache.  You’ve used LINQ to query those collections and bind results to various Silverlight UI elements.  You’ve even serialized those collections to Isolated Storage using memory-efficient JSON.  So what’s left to do? Oh yeah, I guess you might want to know how to upload an object full to data back to a WCF Web Service in Azure.  In order to keep this article simple and to-the-point,

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Posted in Windows Phone 7

If you attended MIX 11 or watched it on Channel 9, you might have seen Todd Brix’s session titled “Making Money with your Applications on Windows Phone.” In this session, Todd talked about all the great things Windows Phone users and developers can expect with the new Marketplace and App Hub in the Mango timeframe.  I just want to focus on two items that will be of great significance to companies and organizations that are looking to build, and privately distribute Windows Phone apps to their employees, partners and customers. The Beta Distribution Service allows developers to distribute pre-certified apps to an access-controlled set of beta users.  How does it work?

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If you attended MIX 11 or watched it on Channel 9, you might have seen Todd Brix’s session titled “Making Money with your Applications on Windows Phone.” In this session, Todd talked about all the great things Windows Phone users and developers can expect with the new Marketplace and App Hub in the Mango timeframe.  I just want to focus on two items that will be of great significance to companies and organizations that are looking to build, and privately distribute Windows Phone apps to their employees, partners and customers. The Beta Distribution Service allows developers to distribute pre-certified apps to an access-controlled set of beta users.  How does it work?

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CIOs are asking for help in confronting the tidal wave of mobile devices entering the enterprise and IT departments have raised the white flag as attempts to block consumer-focused smartphones and tablets have failed. The Consumerization of IT has been a growing trend fueled by cloud-delivered services and compelling mobile devices with wireless capabilities.  This trend snowballs more and more each year, meaning it’s time to embrace it rather than put your head in the sand.  Microsoft MEAP is the answer.  I’ve been talking to you about how Microsoft aligns with Gartner’s Mobile Enterprise Application Platform (MEAP) for years now, and I wanted to update you on how we’ve evolved with respect

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CIOs are asking for help in confronting the tidal wave of mobile devices entering the enterprise and IT departments have raised the white flag as attempts to block consumer-focused smartphones and tablets have failed. The Consumerization of IT has been a growing trend fueled by cloud-delivered services and compelling mobile devices with wireless capabilities.  This trend snowballs more and more each year, meaning it’s time to embrace it rather than put your head in the sand.  Microsoft MEAP is the answer.  I’ve been talking to you about how Microsoft aligns with Gartner’s Mobile Enterprise Application Platform (MEAP) for years now, and I wanted to update you on how we’ve evolved with respect

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Uniqueness is a key factor when synchronizing data between SQL Server/Azure and multiple endpoints like Slates and Smartphones. With data simultaneously created and updated on servers and clients, ensuring rows are unique to avoid key collisions is critical. As you know, each row is uniquely identified by its Primary Key.

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Uniqueness is a key factor when synchronizing data between SQL Server/Azure and multiple endpoints like Slates and Smartphones. With data simultaneously created and updated on servers and clients, ensuring rows are unique to avoid key collisions is critical. As you know, each row is uniquely identified by its Primary Key.

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Posted in SQL Server

About a month ago, I wrote an article intended to help you fill some of the gaps left by the missing SQL Server Compact database. Since your Windows Phone 7 Silverlight app is consuming an ObservableCollection of objects streaming down from Windows Azure and SQL Azure, it makes sense to organize those objects in a database-like format that’s easy to work with.  If you’ve ever worked with Remote Data Access (RDA) in the past, the notion of pre-fetching multiple tables to work with locally should look familiar. In this case, each ObservableCollection represents a table, each object represents a row, and each object property represents a column.  I had you create

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About a month ago, I wrote an article intended to help you fill some of the gaps left by the missing SQL Server Compact database. Since your Windows Phone 7 Silverlight app is consuming an ObservableCollection of objects streaming down from Windows Azure and SQL Azure, it makes sense to organize those objects in a database-like format that’s easy to work with.  If you’ve ever worked with Remote Data Access (RDA) in the past, the notion of pre-fetching multiple tables to work with locally should look familiar. In this case, each ObservableCollection represents a table, each object represents a row, and each object property represents a column.  I had you create

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Posted in Windows Phone 7

By now, you’ve heard me talk a lot about the role wireless data networks play when it comes to the success of your mobile application. They are unreliable, intermittent, highly latent and often slower than they should be due to overtaxed cellular towers and congested backhaul networks.  Hopefully, you’ve built an app that tackles those challenges head-on using efficient WCF REST + JSON Services coupled with an offline data store. So what is the user of your new application going to think when a Web Service call fails because the network is unavailable? An end-user of your app probably won’t be too thrilled when they’re staring at an unintelligible error message. 

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By now, you’ve heard me talk a lot about the role wireless data networks play when it comes to the success of your mobile application. They are unreliable, intermittent, highly latent and often slower than they should be due to overtaxed cellular towers and congested backhaul networks.  Hopefully, you’ve built an app that tackles those challenges head-on using efficient WCF REST + JSON Services coupled with an offline data store. So what is the user of your new application going to think when a Web Service call fails because the network is unavailable? An end-user of your app probably won’t be too thrilled when they’re staring at an unintelligible error message. 

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Posted in Windows Phone 7

In my last article of this series, you finally got to consume wireless-friendly WCF REST + JSON Services from both Windows Server and Windows Azure with data coming from SQL Server/SQL Azure. You now have an ObservableCollection of Customer objects residing in a Singleton on your Windows Phone 7 device.  This Singleton looks similar to an in-memory database and the Customers property works like a table. So now what? If you’re like me, you probably want to display the list of Customers in the UI.  You might also want to perform other local operations against this data store.  You could add a new Customer and update or even delete an existing

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In my last article of this series, you finally got to consume wireless-friendly WCF REST + JSON Services from both Windows Server and Windows Azure with data coming from SQL Server/SQL Azure. You now have an ObservableCollection of Customer objects residing in a Singleton on your Windows Phone 7 device.  This Singleton looks similar to an in-memory database and the Customers property works like a table. So now what? If you’re like me, you probably want to display the list of Customers in the UI.  You might also want to perform other local operations against this data store.  You could add a new Customer and update or even delete an existing

Read more

Posted in Windows Phone 7

In my last two articles, I showed you how to build WCF REST services using Visual Studio 2010 that can reside on-premise in Windows Server 2008 or in the Cloud in Windows Azure.  Furthermore, I demonstrated pulling data from a table in SQL Server/SQL Azure.  I serialized .NET Objects using lightweight JSON to speed data transfers over even the slowest wireless data networks.  Now it’s time to call that REST service from Windows Phone 7. Launch VS2010 and open the solution you created to build the WCF Service Web Role in Azure last time.  Right-click on the solution and add a Windows Phone Application project.  Change the name to ContosoPhone. Part

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In my last two articles, I showed you how to build WCF REST services using Visual Studio 2010 that can reside on-premise in Windows Server 2008 or in the Cloud in Windows Azure.  Furthermore, I demonstrated pulling data from a table in SQL Server/SQL Azure.  I serialized .NET Objects using lightweight JSON to speed data transfers over even the slowest wireless data networks.  Now it’s time to call that REST service from Windows Phone 7. Launch VS2010 and open the solution you created to build the WCF Service Web Role in Azure last time.  Right-click on the solution and add a Windows Phone Application project.  Change the name to ContosoPhone. Part

Read more

Posted in Windows Phone 7

Written by: J. Gerry Purdy 10/20/2010  You have to hand it to Microsoft.   They have certainly fulfilled the old saying, “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.”  Microsoft has had a number of previous attempts to build a successful operating system for the mobile market with WinPad, Windows Mobile and Win CE.  These efforts – simply because they were Microsoft – generated some market presence but nowhere near the market share achieved by major players such as RIM (BlackBerry), Apple (iPhone) and Google (Android). I thought it was poignant when Rob Tiffany, Mobility Architect at Microsoft, told me at CTIA that Microsoft went back to the drawing board to

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Written by: J. Gerry Purdy 10/20/2010  You have to hand it to Microsoft.   They have certainly fulfilled the old saying, “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.”  Microsoft has had a number of previous attempts to build a successful operating system for the mobile market with WinPad, Windows Mobile and Win CE.  These efforts – simply because they were Microsoft – generated some market presence but nowhere near the market share achieved by major players such as RIM (BlackBerry), Apple (iPhone) and Google (Android). I thought it was poignant when Rob Tiffany, Mobility Architect at Microsoft, told me at CTIA that Microsoft went back to the drawing board to

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Posted in Windows Phone 7