Mobile Apps Must Work Offline Because Wireless Connectivity isn’t Ubiquitous

Albuquerque

Intermittent wireless connectivity requires mobile apps to follow sync patterns using pre-fetched data via APIs and offline local storage.

If the network isn’t available, it’s pretty hard for your native app to call web APIs or for your web app to load new web pages. On the Ethernet connected desktops of the past, developers didn’t concern themselves with this issue. In our wireless connected mobile society, ignoring this issue leads to a poor user experience. Most of the time, devices are connected via 2G/3G/4G wireless data networks whose reliability is driven by cell tower density, the number of devices connected to a given tower, wireless frequencies, bandwidth and the number of buildings in the area.

Rather than assuming everything will “just work,” developers of successful apps assume “nothing works.” For starters, mobile apps must take advantage of platform APIs that detect the existence of network connectivity. Once this is established, an app must not only download the data it needs at that given moment but enough data to get through the day. Depending on the amount and complexity of this data, it should be stored locally on the device in a mobile database or as serialized files. From then on, the app should only use the local data to perform its tasks rather than reaching out to servers. Changes made by the user to this local data should be tracked so that only deltas are sent to backend systems when it’s time to upload. Extensive error handling and “sync retries” are needed to ensure reliability. Employees can work in airplane mode or when roaming internationally without using data.

Increase revenue and improve user productivity by using sync to create apps that keep working whether the Internet is available or not. App downtime on a sales call in front of a customer is not an option. Has your company made the move to apps that work offline?

Learn how to digitally transform your company in my newest book, “Mobile Strategies for Business: 50 Actionable Insights to Digitally Transform your Business.”

Book Cover

Click to purchase a copy of my book today and start transforming your business!

Sharing my knowledge and helping others never stops, so connect with me on my blog at http://robtiffany.com , follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/RobTiffany and on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/robtiffany

Delivering Apps to Mobile Devices via Remote Pixel Projection is a Terrible Idea

San Antonio

The use of remote pixel projection technology to view Win32 apps on mobile devices should be considered nothing more than an interim workaround.

What’s the fastest way to move Win32 desktop apps to mobile devices? Don’t feel bad if you chose a remote desktop or screen sharing technology to project PC desktops to smartphones or tablets. This happened decades earlier when companies migrated from 3270 terminal emulation to PC apps. Lots of screen scraping took place to avoid large rewrites.

If you’ve tried various remote desktop technologies on smartphones, you found yourself doing a lot of pinching, zooming, panning and scrolling to accomplish simple tasks. The intermittent nature of wireless data networks results in a frustrating experience. A lack of offline capabilities leads to application errors and possible data loss. Nonexistent integration with essential smartphone sensors leaves employees without the contextual experiences they expect. Obviously, tablets fare much better due to larger screen sizes that more closely match the desktops they’re trying to render. When paired with corporate Wi-Fi, this delivers the least-bad remote experience. The tablet + Wi-Fi scenario is the best compromise for large apps that are difficult to migrate or third-party apps that are out of your control. In limited scenarios where sensitive corporate data is not allowed on a device, remote desktop technologies keep your device free of data. For everything else, remote pixel projection should be a short pause on the road to complete mobile migration.

Reduce risk to your business by using remote pixel technologies in situations where sensitive data cannot be securely moved to a mobile device. Is your company taking a pass on employee productivity by not migrating legacy desktop applications to mobile apps?

Learn how to digitally transform your company in my newest book, “Mobile Strategies for Business: 50 Actionable Insights to Digitally Transform your Business.”

Book Cover

Click to purchase a copy of my book today and start transforming your business!

Sharing my knowledge and helping others never stops, so connect with me on my blog at http://robtiffany.com , follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/RobTiffany and on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/robtiffany

The Cloud is Dead, Long Live the Edge

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We interrupt your regularly scheduled migration to the cloud to bring you a much more important megatrend called the Internet of Things.

The Internet of Things demands a low-latency, distributed, peer-to-peer environment that can only be found in the fog layer via edge computing.

Rob Tiffany Named a Top 100 M2M Influencer

M2M Influencer

In Onalytica’s 2016 analysis and ranking of individuals and brands in the Machine to Machine space, Rob was ranked a top 100 M2M influencer.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the term, Machine to Machine (M2M) refers to the direct communication between devices using a variety of communications channels, including wired and wireless. Many of you will think this is the same or similar to the Internet of Things and you wouldn’t necessarily be wrong. I started my career in the M2M space connecting unintelligent vending machines to primitive wireless networks to derive value from remotely monitoring them. Needless to say, a lot has changed since then.

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In modern terms, traditional M2M is often expressed as the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) or Industrie 4.0. Imagine the value to be derived from connecting, analyzing and acting on data from industries such as healthcare, automotive, oil and gas, agriculture, government, smart cities, manufacturing, and public utilities. It’s an exciting space to be in and it’s rapidly transforming our world.

Check it out at http://www.onalytica.com/blog/posts/M2M-2016-Top-100-Influencers-Brands/

Sharing my knowledge and helping others never stops, so connect with me on my blog at http://robtiffany.com , follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/RobTiffany and on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/robtiffany

Improve User Experience by Extending Wireless to Customers and Employees

Las Vegas

Use Femtocells + mobile broadband routers to extend wireless to customers & employees without coverage in buildings or at remote work sites.

It goes without saying that not all organizations are the same. They don’t all reside in offices in downtown skyscrapers or on corporate campuses. The way employees work and how customers are served varies greatly. It’s important your mobile strategy reflects these differences.

Let’s talk about employees that don’t work in your Wi-Fi saturated office. Just because your workforce has corporate-liable or personally-liable mobile devices, doesn’t mean they have the wireless coverage to make them work. In the construction business, you have a group of employees performing tasks outside at a work site. To ensure this team can connect to corporate resources, you may need to deploy a Femtocell and a mobile broadband router. This is a mobile hot spot on steroids that allows you to extend cellular coverage to areas where you need it.

Oftentimes you have to extend wireless coverage to your customers. If you own a sports stadium you have to enhance coverage while supporting a higher density of connected devices. If you own a casino or convention center, it’s imperative you provide pervasive indoor cellular coverage so your guests can keep using their phones. These cases require you to deploy microcells as well as additional data backhaul capacity. As always, apply pressure on mobile operators to provide network coverage if they want to keep your business.

Improve customer experience and user productivity by extending wireless coverage to employees and customers alike. What is your organization doing to bring wireless to its important stakeholders?

Learn how to digitally transform your company in my newest book, “Mobile Strategies for Business: 50 Actionable Insights to Digitally Transform your Business.”

Book Cover

Click to purchase a copy of my book today and start transforming your business!

Sharing my knowledge and helping others never stops, so connect with me on my blog at http://robtiffany.com , follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/RobTiffany and on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/robtiffany

 

Reduce Business Risks by Creating a Corporate Mobile Center of Excellence

Create a corporate mobile center of excellence to create processes, establish governance & develop a matrix of supported devices.

Your transformation must begin with your people!

Despite the growing maturity of mobile technologies in the enterprise, most organizations have been unable to put the governance in place needed to make mobility work well for employees and employers alike. When BYOD users don’t know the rules for using their devices at work, it’s the same as having no rules at all.

The most important step you can take is to create a mobile center of excellence (COE) comprised of employees from most of your different business units and IT. This team will create processes that make the best use of your technology:

  • Creating a matrix of supported devices that meet the company’s app, security and management needs
  • Creating a document that spells-out all mobile policies and procedures
  • Defining how telecom expenses will be covered via stipends or reimbursements as well as international roaming policies
  • Performing due diligence on the selection of app development, backend integration and device management packages
  • Defining wireless LAN, WAN and cellular standards as well as negotiating plans with mobile operators

Establishing a Mobile Center of Excellence will not only reduce risk to your company by clearly spelling-out what your employees can and cannot do, but it will also improve employee productivity by eliminating all the “guess work.” What steps is your organization taking to assemble relevant stakeholders to build a mobile COE?

Learn how to digitally transform your company in my newest book, “Mobile Strategies for Business: 50 Actionable Insights to Digitally Transform your Business.”

Book Cover

Click to purchase a copy of my book today and start transforming your business!

Sharing my knowledge and helping others never stops, so connect with me on my blog at http://robtiffany.com , follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/RobTiffany and on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/robtiffany

Seize the Opportunity of the Internet of Things

VendLink

There are a lot of newcomers to the Internet of Things (IoT) and Machine to Machine (M2M) space lately. Many of them love to speak authoritatively and often use vending machines as their favorite example use case to illustrate the value of IoT.

When you see me use vending machines in a similar fashion, it’s not because of an article I read, a slide deck I copied, or a bandwagon I jumped on. It’s because I actually built this stuff twenty years ago with a group of visionaries and the best engineers I’ve ever worked with in my career.

We didn’t wait until vending machines became intelligent and wireless technologies became pervasive. We took the overwhelming population of unintelligent, fully mechanical vending machines and made them intelligent with our embedded technologies to unlock their insights. Wireless data coverage was a nightmare and the cost per byte would seem insane by today’s standards, but we weren’t going to force route drivers to visit and plugin to vending machines to find out what was going on. We created tiny, bit-encoded data packets on null-modem cables that we brought to a multitude of wireless technologies in order to create cost-effective coverage in the markets we served. Oftentimes, we created our own modems to bounce packets off business radio towers. Yes, we realized that giving each machine an antenna in a bank of vending machines was inefficient so we created gateway technology. As our software analyzed the telemetry we streamed from thousands of vending machines, we brought to life the game-changing insights I see companies “discovering” today. Our company was called Real Time Data and we brought things like real time inventory management, dynamic routing, predictive failure analysis, intelligent merchandising, revenue forecasting, theft alerts and many other insights to an industry run on quarters and dimes. We didn’t have the Internet to connect our “things” to. We either used or created our own private data networks.

These days when I meet around a camp fire with the wireless telemetry pioneers I worked with all those years ago, we often laugh about how easy it would be to recreate these solutions today. Machines and sensors are now intelligent, wireless data networks are cheap and pervasive, IPv6 means we can connect almost anything, off the shelf analytics tools abound, machine learning is here, and cloud computing power is almost limitless. We used to call some of this stuff SCADA, but you can call this combination of streaming telemetry plus command and control the Internet of Things. Now is the time to seize the opportunity right there in front of you to revolutionize your business. It’s all about reducing expenses, boosting customer satisfaction and increasing revenue.

Sharing my knowledge and helping others never stops, so connect with me on my blog at http://robtiffany.com , follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/RobTiffany and on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/robtiffany

Enterprise Mobility Exchange 2014

Enterprise Mobility Exchange

Join me in Las Vegas for the Enterprise Mobility Exchange at Caesars Palace on October 27-28.

I’ll be discussing the current state of enterprise mobility as well as future trends that definitely need to be on your radar.  I’ll also be talking about the Internet of Things (IoT) phenomenon and how sensors, beacons, and real-time telemetry can not only improve productivity but positively impact the bottom line of your organization.  Joined by mobile analysts and executives, you’ll get a chance to learn from some of the top mobile thought leaders in world.

Come meet me in Vegas!

Sharing my knowledge and helping others never stops, so connect with me on my blog at http://robtiffany.com , follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/RobTiffany and on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/robtiffany

Mobile World Congress in Pictures

Hola

While Winter rages on in most of the northern hemisphere, Mobile World Congress brings us Springtime in lovely Barcelona.

Hola from sunny Barcelona!  Mobile World Congress 2014 is bigger than ever with over 85,000 attendees.  With mobility firmly in control as the world’s largest megatrend in both consumer and enterprise technology, MWC14 has cemented itself as the most important global conference.  Once the domain of network equipment manufacturers, handset makers, and mobile operators, this event now attracts entrepreneurs and executives from virtually every major company.

Hola

Having Mark Zuckerberg on hand for the keynote to kick things off definitely tells me something has changed.  Most of his keynote focused on having mobile operators work with Internet.org to deliver free bandwidth to connect the 2/3rds of the world that aren’t connected.  I won’t dwell on the $19 billion WhatsApp acquisition except to say that there’s never been a better time to be a mobile developer.

Zuckerberg_MWC14

This first announcements of the event came from Microsoft where we added to our existing lineup of partners (HTC, Huawei, Nokia and Samsung).  New hardware partners include: Foxconn, Gionee, JSR, Karbonn, Lava (Xolo), Lenovo, LG, Longcheer and ZTE.  This expands Windows Phone’s reach to 56% of the global smartphone markets.  Just as important was our announcement to lower of bill of materials (BOM) costs of Windows Phone hardware by supporting Qualcomm Snapdragon 200 and 400 series chipsets and soft keys.  This allows Windows Phones to penetrate more price-sensitive markets and go after the next billion smartphone users.  Along the way, we further enhance our adoption by supporting dual SIM phones and supporting all major cellular technologies, including LTE (TDD/FDD), HSPA+, EVDO and TD-SCMA.

ReyJuanCarlos

Targeting emerging markets, Nokia announced the X family of low-cost Android smartphones.  Positioned below the Windows Phone Lumia range, these devices swap out Google services for Microsoft services including things like OneDrive, Outlook.com, Here maps, and Skype.  With the announcements made by Microsoft the previous day to lower Windows Phone hardware BOM costs, this new line of devices may find themselves bumping into the low end of the Lumia line.  They definitely have apps on their side with reports that they’ll run 75% of Google Play apps out of the box.  Speaking of low-cost, the Nokia Lumia 520 won the Global Mobile Award for Best Low Cost Smartphone at MWC this year.

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Via its Unpacked event, Samsung launched the Galaxy S5, Gear 2, Gear Neo, and Gear Fit health band.  The Galaxy S5 looks a lot like the GS4 with a dimpled back cover, finger scanner, heart rate monitor, and an upgraded camera.  I suppose it’s the same kind of “yawner” upgrade that Apple gets away with each year with the iPhone.  Of all their new wearables, the sleek, Gear Fit stole the show with a colorful, curved display reminiscent of the Nike Fuel Band.

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On the enterprise side of the house, Samsung has made updates to their KNOX technologies.  KNOX 2.0 takes advantage of the multiuser capabilities of Android KitKat to provide dual/multi persona container capabilities without requiring app wrapping.  This means that just about any app in the Google Play store should work unmodified which eliminates the “hassle factor” of app wrapping to run a particular container.  Speaking of containers, KNOX 2.0 will now work with 3rd party containers such as Good’s secure container, Fixmo’s SafeZone and MobileIron’s AppConnect.  Last but not least, Samsung also launched KNOX EMM and Marketplace which support mobile device management, Identity and Access Management, and apps from the cloud with Galaxy and iOS devices.

Samsung KNOX

Lots of folks liked to hang out in the Sustainability Garden to take a break under the bubble.

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Almost everyone found themselves grabbing a snack and talking to other attendees in the various Networking Gardens.

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In other news, Samsung is taking over the world via the clever use of footballers.

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AppMachine facilitates rapid, multiplatform development of native apps via their web apps and Lego blocks.  Very impressed with their demo!

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Embarcadero keeps Delphi development relevant across mobile devices.  Let’s hear it for Object Pascal and the enduring legacy of Anders Hejlsberg!

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kwamecorp is an agency doing very cool mobile design and development work around the world.  They also fund startups that they think will drive positive change in the world.

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MicroStrategy has a mobile app platform that allows you to turn any business function into a mobile app without writing any code.

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The W3C is here to remind us that HTML5 is the only open, multiplatform development technology that isn’t controlled by any one company.  I’m a fan!

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vserv.mobi is one of many mobile advertising platform companies present in the App Planet hall in Fira Gran Via.

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This just looks cool.

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Globo demonstrated their secure container solution for Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8.1 for me.  Their container included an Exchange Active Sync client and remote file access.

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Nice to see Washington State representing all our great local technology companies.

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The beautiful HTC One snagged the Global Mobile Award for Best Smartphone at MWC this year.  They also launched the mid-range Desire 610.

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SAP is charging into the world of enterprise mobility with the one-two punch of Afaria for device management and SAP Mobile Platform to build apps across all mobile operating systems.  They also announced a new partnership with Xamarin to allow Microsoft Visual Studio developers to link to SAP’s Mobile Platform.  Merging Sybase Unwired Platform (SUP) and Syclo Agentry platform and implementing OData represents their MEAP/MADP roadmap.

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Panasonic is the real deal when it comes to enterprise mobility solutions.  I was excited to see them launch the Toughpad FZ-E1 running Windows Embedded 8 Handheld.  If you can build Windows Phone apps, you can build apps for their new rugged handheld.  Get after it!

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I found a company trying to cash in on the likenesses of Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and some other guy.

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fitbit is one of the wearable fitness pioneers, but you’d never know it if you judged them by the size of their booth at this giant, mobile beauty pageant.

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SOTI touted their MobiControl Android+ technology to enable, optimize and secure Android for the enterprise.

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Sophos talked-up IDC’s research note that found the 25% of SMB organizations currently utilize Sophos Mobile Control as their MDM solution to govern and manage their mobile devices.

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Who doesn’t love GoPro?  I need to head back to Whistler.

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Citrix announced XenMobile for Samsung KNOX and claims the most KNOX-certified apps.

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Huawei launched the MediaPad X1 tablet with a 7-inch screen and cellular connectivity, which means it also serves as a giant smartphone.  They also introduced TalkBand wearables that pair with the X1 via Bluetooth to provide fitness data.

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LG launched the G Pro 2 phablet as well the G2 Mini.  LG’s Knock Code is an interesting security feature that allows you to tap the phone on the correct quadrant of the display to unlock it.

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Sony had a giant booth that seemed like a spaceship.  The launched their flagship Xperia Z2 smartphone and Xperia Z2 tablet.

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Sony also released their SmartBand fitness and tracker wearable that works with their new smartphone.

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The world’s top PC company introduced 3 new Android smartphones as well as a new 10-inch Yoga Tablet that gets 18 hours of battery life.

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Bill is doing a great job of demonstrating Microsoft’s 3 screen strategy across Xbox, Windows and Windows Phone.

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ZTE launched their ultra slim Grand Memo II LTE phablet with a 6 inch screen.  Additionally, they showed-off their ZTE Open C built in partnership with Mozilla and Telefonica.  It looks like they’re covering the high-end with Android and the low-end with Firefox OS.  They also talked about their smart city solution, ZTE iCity.

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Qualcomm chipsets power more mobile devices found at MWC than anyone else.

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John Chambers, the chairman and CEO of Cisco, claimed the Internet of Things space has the potential to generate $19 trillion worth of profit and economic benefits over the next decade.  That’s a lot of cash.

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Newly-acquired AirWatch had a massive booth and really emphasized their Secure Content Locker (MCM) technology this year.

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This small version of Oracle’s Americas Cup sailboat was the coolest thing at their booth.

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A $25 Firefox OS reference design was the talk of MWC.  I played with their HTML5 mobile operating system running on Alcatel and ZTE phones and they’ve definitely come a long way since last year.

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I actually kinda like Asus’ new ZenUI for the ZenFone.  Gotta differentiate from other Android handset makers somehow.

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What are my broad takeaways from this event?

  • There’s lots of unimaginative Android rectangles for sale that are undifferentiated from competitors
  • There’s a flood of fitness wearables taking advantage of Bluetooth LE
  • Lots of new players entering an already crowded EMM space
  • The device I saw people using most often was a Moleskine + Pen
  • Reaching out to the next billion people with low cost phones and connectivity is trending

See you next year!

Sharing my knowledge and helping others never stops, so connect with me on my blog at http://robtiffany.com , follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/RobTiffany and on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/robtiffany

Mobile World Congress 2013 Takeaways

FiraGranVia

Mobile World Congress has wrapped up and most of us are back home after spending four days at Fira Gran Via in Barcelona.

Between delivering presentations, walking miles of expo halls, and participating in dozens of meetings, the event is both exciting and tiring.  This conference used to be the sole domain of mobile operators, wireless equipment manufacturers, and handset makers.  Something has changed…

 

Mobile is no longer this fringe technology that lives on the outskirts of mainstream computing and communications technology.  It is now the primary technology used by consumers and corporations to get things done and stay productive and connected.  With 72,000 people in attendance, this is now one of the largest and most important technology conferences in the world.  Yes, the CEOs, CIOs, and CTOs of many of the worlds largest corporations were in attendance along with consulting firms looking to transform those organizations into mobile enterprises.  There’s no doubt about it, I could definitely feel the increased enterprise importance all around Fira Gran Via.

So what did I see…

If there was any doubt that 2013 was going to be the year of the Phablet, MWC put those fears to rest.  Launches of giant Android smartphones to compete with the Samsung Galaxy Note II included:

  • The 5.5″ LG Optimus G Pro
  • The 5.7″ ZTE Grand Memo
  • The 5″ Sony Xperia Z
  • The 6.1″ Huawei Ascend Mate

In the “not-quite-a-phablet” category, there were quite a few Android devices launched that were virtually indistinguishable from each other.  I’m not advocating fragmentation, but I wasn’t jazzed by the sea of sameness represented by all these Android clones.

The only Android standout this year was the HTC One.  Its truly beautiful hardware design combined with a home screen that mimics Windows Phone start screen tiles, sets it apart from its Jelly Bean competitors.  Flattery I guess.

HTCOne

Tablets were getting smaller and I really liked the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 with the S-Pen.  It was thin, light, easy to hold, super fast and it’s definitely going to give the iPad Mini a run for its money.  On the opposite end of the spectrum, HP showed off its forgettable Slate 7 Android tablet to compete against the Kindle Fire and Nexus 7 in a race to the bottom.  Personally, I always believed HP should have doubled-down on the innovative webOS that it paid almost $2 billion for.  Instead, it unloaded this asset on LG on the first day of the conference.  Can you imagine how fast the beautiful webOS would run on today’s multicore ARM processors?

Speaking of web-based mobile operating systems, Mozilla managed to line up 17 mobile operators to support its Firefox OS running on devices from LG, ZTE, and others.  It’s targeting low-end devices in emerging markets with low-cost phones.  It’s not a bad strategy, but they still have a lot of work to do because I found their demo devices to be both slow and unattractive.  On the other hand, I found the Ubuntu Touch phone and tablet to be attractive, differentiated, and very responsive.  It will definitely be a strong competitor once it gets off the ground.

In hearing the call to reach out to the “next billion” people in developing markets, Nokia launched a range of devices at progressively lower price points.  From the Nokia 105 feature phone at under $20 up through the entry-level Lumia 520 Windows Phone, to the mid-range Lumia 720, Nokia made some important moves to diversify its portfolio with delightful devices.

Anyone who walked the halls of the Fira Gran Via couldn’t miss the overwhelming presence of Samsung at this event.  They were most definitely the 800-pound gorilla of the show and synonymous with the success of Android in the consumer space.  It’s clear that being the leader in the consumer space is no longer enough for them.  They’ve recognized the Android security shortcomings that have kept this mobile OS out of the enterprise and they’re doing something about it.  Following on the heels of Samsung For Enterprise (SAFE), at MWC they launched Samsung Knox.Knox

From my vantage point as an enterprise mobility strategist, the launch of Samsung Knox is the single most impactful event this year in Barcelona.  Samsung has introduced a dual-persona phone technology that may help Android break into the enterprise.  Users can easily switch between the personal side of their phone to a separate, encrypted container for business.  Unlike other containerization solutions, this one runs fast and the email, calendar, and apps look familiar to users of the Samsung Touchwiz user interface.  Combined with the fact that the leaders from the MDM magic-quadrant were already offering secure, private app distribution solutions based on the Knox APIs, Samsung has a formidable solution for the enterprise.

I really enjoyed co-presenting with my Microsoft colleagues Andy Wigley and Larry Lieberman at the Nokia App Developer Conference on day 1 of MWC.  Helping to empower developers from all over the world to do their best work targeting Windows Phone 8 is very rewarding.

SpeakingAtMWC

Later in the week I had the privilege of serving on a panel with Benjamin Robbins, Vishy Gopalakrishna, and Ben Smith where we discussed “The Future of Enterprise Mobility.”  We tackled subjects such as mobile security, BYOD, enterprise apps, the roles of mobile centers of excellence, and how to enable legacy apps for mobile consumption.  I even coined the term “MSOA” which stands for Mobile Service Oriented Architecture.  In other words, it’s time to replace those SOAP and XML web services with lightweight REST and JSON services + caching and compression to better serve all mobile devices over unpredictable wireless data networks.

See you in Barcelona next year,

Rob

Sharing my knowledge and helping others never stops, so connect with me on my blog at http://robtiffany.com , follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/RobTiffany and on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/robtiffany

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