Replace your large, complex, monolithic Win32 apps that still provide business value with multiple, single-purpose mobile apps. I was involved in the architecture and development of some really large systems for some of the world’s largest companies. The user interfaces for all these systems had hundreds of screens. People with various job functions, from multiple departments, looking for different outcomes might all use the same app. These massive systems tried to be all things to everyone. Employees working in multiple departments found themselves using the same giant app despite never interacting with similar screens or workflows to perform their jobs. Expensive, time-consuming training was always required. Mobile doesn’t work this way.

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Replace your large, complex, monolithic Win32 apps that still provide business value with multiple, single-purpose mobile apps. I was involved in the architecture and development of some really large systems for some of the world’s largest companies. The user interfaces for all these systems had hundreds of screens. People with various job functions, from multiple departments, looking for different outcomes might all use the same app. These massive systems tried to be all things to everyone. Employees working in multiple departments found themselves using the same giant app despite never interacting with similar screens or workflows to perform their jobs. Expensive, time-consuming training was always required. Mobile doesn’t work this way.

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Migrate those Visual Basic, Delphi, VisualAge, PowerBuilder, SQL Windows, JBuilder and Visual Cafe Win32 applications to secure sandboxed mobile apps. Hope I didn’t leave out your favorite development tools from the 90s. The Mac stagnated, OS/2 didn’t capture market share and the inexpensive, developer-friendly Windows platform benefited. Companies all over the world deployed Windows 3.1 and then Windows 95 and NT. Easy to use, drag and drop development tools meant you didn’t have to have a computer science degree to build powerful apps. Desktop apps of varying quality spread like wildfire. Apps back then could manipulate the operating system, talk directly to other apps and perform all kinds of insecure, destabilizing

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Migrate those Visual Basic, Delphi, VisualAge, PowerBuilder, SQL Windows, JBuilder and Visual Cafe Win32 applications to secure sandboxed mobile apps. Hope I didn’t leave out your favorite development tools from the 90s. The Mac stagnated, OS/2 didn’t capture market share and the inexpensive, developer-friendly Windows platform benefited. Companies all over the world deployed Windows 3.1 and then Windows 95 and NT. Easy to use, drag and drop development tools meant you didn’t have to have a computer science degree to build powerful apps. Desktop apps of varying quality spread like wildfire. Apps back then could manipulate the operating system, talk directly to other apps and perform all kinds of insecure, destabilizing

Read more

Move your older, distributed broker technologies like CORBA, RMI, DCOM & RPC to REST APIs that communicate with any device, app, browser or endpoint. A lot of the bigger companies built large, complex, distributed systems that relied on a variety of technologies to make them work. For example, code in an app makes local function calls in order to get things done. In distributed systems that spanned multiple servers, data centers and geographies, the notion of software in one system calling a function in a system somewhere else was referred to as a remote procedure call (RPC). This was a transformative technology but making it work wasn’t trivial. The Object Management

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Move your older, distributed broker technologies like CORBA, RMI, DCOM & RPC to REST APIs that communicate with any device, app, browser or endpoint. A lot of the bigger companies built large, complex, distributed systems that relied on a variety of technologies to make them work. For example, code in an app makes local function calls in order to get things done. In distributed systems that spanned multiple servers, data centers and geographies, the notion of software in one system calling a function in a system somewhere else was referred to as a remote procedure call (RPC). This was a transformative technology but making it work wasn’t trivial. The Object Management

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Businesses drag their feet when mobilizing line of business apps via legacy software migration thinking it’s cheaper to maintain a codebase than to rewrite. I get it. Migrating all those apps to mobile seems like eating the proverbial elephant. They cost a lot of money to build, the highly-skilled developers needed to rewrite the code are harder to find than ever, the code isn’t commented and there aren’t any docs. This often leads to IT decision makers putting off these projects, perhaps until it’s not their problem anymore. So why do it? For starters, your employees will be significantly more productive running your apps on the mobile devices they actually use.

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Businesses drag their feet when mobilizing line of business apps via legacy software migration thinking it’s cheaper to maintain a codebase than to rewrite. I get it. Migrating all those apps to mobile seems like eating the proverbial elephant. They cost a lot of money to build, the highly-skilled developers needed to rewrite the code are harder to find than ever, the code isn’t commented and there aren’t any docs. This often leads to IT decision makers putting off these projects, perhaps until it’s not their problem anymore. So why do it? For starters, your employees will be significantly more productive running your apps on the mobile devices they actually use.

Read more

It’s time to migrate the millions of Win32 and Web 1.0 apps that currently run global business to mobile. Global businesses are run primarily by Windows applications built in the 90s. While apps were created for DOS, the Apple II, OS/2, Sun Workstations, Win16, NeXT, SGI and the Mac in the 80s and early 90s, most were migrated after Windows NT/95 arrived. Y2K taught us COBOL on mainframes are still around. The larger mega-trend stemmed from low-cost PCs coupled to a graphical operating system working with minimal RAM and slow processors. Combined with drag and drop GUI development tools, a perfect storm took over the world of business. The resulting Win32

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It’s time to migrate the millions of Win32 and Web 1.0 apps that currently run global business to mobile. Global businesses are run primarily by Windows applications built in the 90s. While apps were created for DOS, the Apple II, OS/2, Sun Workstations, Win16, NeXT, SGI and the Mac in the 80s and early 90s, most were migrated after Windows NT/95 arrived. Y2K taught us COBOL on mainframes are still around. The larger mega-trend stemmed from low-cost PCs coupled to a graphical operating system working with minimal RAM and slow processors. Combined with drag and drop GUI development tools, a perfect storm took over the world of business. The resulting Win32

Read more