Move your older, distributed broker technologies like CORBA, RMI, DCOM & RPC to REST APIs that communicate with any device, app, browser or endpoint. A lot of the bigger companies built large, complex, distributed systems that relied on a variety of technologies to make them work. For example, code in an app makes local function calls in order to get things done. In distributed systems that spanned multiple servers, data centers and geographies, the notion of software in one system calling a function in a system somewhere else was referred to as a remote procedure call (RPC). This was a transformative technology but making it work wasn’t trivial. The Object Management

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Move your older, distributed broker technologies like CORBA, RMI, DCOM & RPC to REST APIs that communicate with any device, app, browser or endpoint. A lot of the bigger companies built large, complex, distributed systems that relied on a variety of technologies to make them work. For example, code in an app makes local function calls in order to get things done. In distributed systems that spanned multiple servers, data centers and geographies, the notion of software in one system calling a function in a system somewhere else was referred to as a remote procedure call (RPC). This was a transformative technology but making it work wasn’t trivial. The Object Management

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The mobile Internet communicates with HTTP(S), follows an architectural style called REST, serializes data as JSON & compresses with GZip and Deflate. These different standards weren’t mashed together by a working group. They represent a grass-roots phenomenon that transformed how the Internet communicates. Data traverses the globe through routers and firewalls via the Hypertext Transfer Protocol HTTP(S). While standards bodies worked for years to create the simple object access protocol (SOAP), the representational state transfer protocol (REST) emerged from a Phd dissertation. REST used the basic verbs of HTTP including GET, POST, PUT and DELETE, to pass messages and call remote procedures across heterogeneous systems. You probably remember the XML craze

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The mobile Internet communicates with HTTP(S), follows an architectural style called REST, serializes data as JSON & compresses with GZip and Deflate. These different standards weren’t mashed together by a working group. They represent a grass-roots phenomenon that transformed how the Internet communicates. Data traverses the globe through routers and firewalls via the Hypertext Transfer Protocol HTTP(S). While standards bodies worked for years to create the simple object access protocol (SOAP), the representational state transfer protocol (REST) emerged from a Phd dissertation. REST used the basic verbs of HTTP including GET, POST, PUT and DELETE, to pass messages and call remote procedures across heterogeneous systems. You probably remember the XML craze

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At TechEd New Zealand, I presented a session on how to integrate a company’s backend systems into SQL Server 2014 and deliver that data out to mobile devices via Web APIs to support the operations of occasionally-connected apps on mobile devices using NoSQL tables. Enterprise mobility is a top priority for Chief Information Officers who must empower employees and reach customers by moving data from backend systems out to apps on mobile devices.  This data must flow over inefficient wireless data networks, be consumable by any mobile device, and scale to support millions of users while delivering exceptional performance.  Since wireless coverage is inconsistent, apps must store this data offline so users can be productive

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At TechEd New Zealand, I presented a session on how to integrate a company’s backend systems into SQL Server 2014 and deliver that data out to mobile devices via Web APIs to support the operations of occasionally-connected apps on mobile devices using NoSQL tables. Enterprise mobility is a top priority for Chief Information Officers who must empower employees and reach customers by moving data from backend systems out to apps on mobile devices.  This data must flow over inefficient wireless data networks, be consumable by any mobile device, and scale to support millions of users while delivering exceptional performance.  Since wireless coverage is inconsistent, apps must store this data offline so users can be productive

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Posted in Database

Those of you who know me or have attended one of my presentations know that I’m a total RESTafarian when it comes to the software architectural style I prefer for web services. I started using REST in the early 2000s to create a high-speed, human-readable, server API to trade financial instruments between brokerages and counterparties. When SOAP finally got traction in the .NET and Java world, I started using it because WSDL and widespread tooling made it easy for people to consume the web services I had to publish. XML was having its moment in the sun. That being said, I could never get past the clear drop in performance I

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Those of you who know me or have attended one of my presentations know that I’m a total RESTafarian when it comes to the software architectural style I prefer for web services. I started using REST in the early 2000s to create a high-speed, human-readable, server API to trade financial instruments between brokerages and counterparties. When SOAP finally got traction in the .NET and Java world, I started using it because WSDL and widespread tooling made it easy for people to consume the web services I had to publish. XML was having its moment in the sun. That being said, I could never get past the clear drop in performance I

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Posted in Architecture

Looking back over the last 6 months of this series of articles, you’ve created wireless-efficient WCF REST + JSON Web Services in Azure to download data from SQL Azure tables to Windows Phone. You’ve maintained in-memory collections of objects in your own local NoSQL object cache.  You’ve used LINQ to query those collections and bind results to various Silverlight UI elements.  You’ve even serialized those collections to Isolated Storage using memory-efficient JSON.  So what’s left to do? Oh yeah, I guess you might want to know how to upload an object full to data back to a WCF Web Service in Azure.  In order to keep this article simple and to-the-point,

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Looking back over the last 6 months of this series of articles, you’ve created wireless-efficient WCF REST + JSON Web Services in Azure to download data from SQL Azure tables to Windows Phone. You’ve maintained in-memory collections of objects in your own local NoSQL object cache.  You’ve used LINQ to query those collections and bind results to various Silverlight UI elements.  You’ve even serialized those collections to Isolated Storage using memory-efficient JSON.  So what’s left to do? Oh yeah, I guess you might want to know how to upload an object full to data back to a WCF Web Service in Azure.  In order to keep this article simple and to-the-point,

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Posted in Windows Phone 7

CIOs are asking for help in confronting the tidal wave of mobile devices entering the enterprise and IT departments have raised the white flag as attempts to block consumer-focused smartphones and tablets have failed. The Consumerization of IT has been a growing trend fueled by cloud-delivered services and compelling mobile devices with wireless capabilities.  This trend snowballs more and more each year, meaning it’s time to embrace it rather than put your head in the sand.  Microsoft MEAP is the answer.  I’ve been talking to you about how Microsoft aligns with Gartner’s Mobile Enterprise Application Platform (MEAP) for years now, and I wanted to update you on how we’ve evolved with respect

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CIOs are asking for help in confronting the tidal wave of mobile devices entering the enterprise and IT departments have raised the white flag as attempts to block consumer-focused smartphones and tablets have failed. The Consumerization of IT has been a growing trend fueled by cloud-delivered services and compelling mobile devices with wireless capabilities.  This trend snowballs more and more each year, meaning it’s time to embrace it rather than put your head in the sand.  Microsoft MEAP is the answer.  I’ve been talking to you about how Microsoft aligns with Gartner’s Mobile Enterprise Application Platform (MEAP) for years now, and I wanted to update you on how we’ve evolved with respect

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About a month ago, I wrote an article intended to help you fill some of the gaps left by the missing SQL Server Compact database. Since your Windows Phone 7 Silverlight app is consuming an ObservableCollection of objects streaming down from Windows Azure and SQL Azure, it makes sense to organize those objects in a database-like format that’s easy to work with.  If you’ve ever worked with Remote Data Access (RDA) in the past, the notion of pre-fetching multiple tables to work with locally should look familiar. In this case, each ObservableCollection represents a table, each object represents a row, and each object property represents a column.  I had you create

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About a month ago, I wrote an article intended to help you fill some of the gaps left by the missing SQL Server Compact database. Since your Windows Phone 7 Silverlight app is consuming an ObservableCollection of objects streaming down from Windows Azure and SQL Azure, it makes sense to organize those objects in a database-like format that’s easy to work with.  If you’ve ever worked with Remote Data Access (RDA) in the past, the notion of pre-fetching multiple tables to work with locally should look familiar. In this case, each ObservableCollection represents a table, each object represents a row, and each object property represents a column.  I had you create

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Posted in Windows Phone 7

By now, you’ve heard me talk a lot about the role wireless data networks play when it comes to the success of your mobile application. They are unreliable, intermittent, highly latent and often slower than they should be due to overtaxed cellular towers and congested backhaul networks.  Hopefully, you’ve built an app that tackles those challenges head-on using efficient WCF REST + JSON Services coupled with an offline data store. So what is the user of your new application going to think when a Web Service call fails because the network is unavailable? An end-user of your app probably won’t be too thrilled when they’re staring at an unintelligible error message. 

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By now, you’ve heard me talk a lot about the role wireless data networks play when it comes to the success of your mobile application. They are unreliable, intermittent, highly latent and often slower than they should be due to overtaxed cellular towers and congested backhaul networks.  Hopefully, you’ve built an app that tackles those challenges head-on using efficient WCF REST + JSON Services coupled with an offline data store. So what is the user of your new application going to think when a Web Service call fails because the network is unavailable? An end-user of your app probably won’t be too thrilled when they’re staring at an unintelligible error message. 

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Posted in Windows Phone 7

In my last two articles, I showed you how to build WCF REST services using Visual Studio 2010 that can reside on-premise in Windows Server 2008 or in the Cloud in Windows Azure.  Furthermore, I demonstrated pulling data from a table in SQL Server/SQL Azure.  I serialized .NET Objects using lightweight JSON to speed data transfers over even the slowest wireless data networks.  Now it’s time to call that REST service from Windows Phone 7. Launch VS2010 and open the solution you created to build the WCF Service Web Role in Azure last time.  Right-click on the solution and add a Windows Phone Application project.  Change the name to ContosoPhone. Part

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In my last two articles, I showed you how to build WCF REST services using Visual Studio 2010 that can reside on-premise in Windows Server 2008 or in the Cloud in Windows Azure.  Furthermore, I demonstrated pulling data from a table in SQL Server/SQL Azure.  I serialized .NET Objects using lightweight JSON to speed data transfers over even the slowest wireless data networks.  Now it’s time to call that REST service from Windows Phone 7. Launch VS2010 and open the solution you created to build the WCF Service Web Role in Azure last time.  Right-click on the solution and add a Windows Phone Application project.  Change the name to ContosoPhone. Part

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Posted in Windows Phone 7

Ever since my last blog post where I demonstrated how to create lightweight WCF REST + JSON services for consumption by Windows Phone 7, I’ve received many requests from folks wanting to know how to do the same thing from Windows Azure.  Using Visual Studio 2010, the Azure Development Fabric and SQL Server, I will show you how to move this code to the cloud. Fire up VS2010 and create a new cloud project (you’ll be prompted to download all the Azure bits if you haven’t done so already). Select WCF Service Web Role and move it over to your Cloud Service Solution.  Rename it to AzureRestService and click OK. You’ll

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Ever since my last blog post where I demonstrated how to create lightweight WCF REST + JSON services for consumption by Windows Phone 7, I’ve received many requests from folks wanting to know how to do the same thing from Windows Azure.  Using Visual Studio 2010, the Azure Development Fabric and SQL Server, I will show you how to move this code to the cloud. Fire up VS2010 and create a new cloud project (you’ll be prompted to download all the Azure bits if you haven’t done so already). Select WCF Service Web Role and move it over to your Cloud Service Solution.  Rename it to AzureRestService and click OK. You’ll

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Posted in Azure

Let’s start at the server and work our way to the phone.  Anyone who knows me is probably aware that I come from a wireless background so I’m always obsessed with things like coverage, bandwidth and latency when it comes to building mobile systems.  The only thing I assume in mobile development is frequent network dropouts and 28.8 kb/s modem speeds.  Think Compuserve.  For device apps to be successful, they must pre-fetch the data they need and cache it offline so a user can keep working when the network is not around.  This is not typical SOA, calling Web Services on-demand to help drive your application.  If your connectivity is that

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Let’s start at the server and work our way to the phone.  Anyone who knows me is probably aware that I come from a wireless background so I’m always obsessed with things like coverage, bandwidth and latency when it comes to building mobile systems.  The only thing I assume in mobile development is frequent network dropouts and 28.8 kb/s modem speeds.  Think Compuserve.  For device apps to be successful, they must pre-fetch the data they need and cache it offline so a user can keep working when the network is not around.  This is not typical SOA, calling Web Services on-demand to help drive your application.  If your connectivity is that

Read more

Posted in Windows Phone 7